Yosemite_Select

The Yosemite Select page is a 75 image Overview of the Yosemite National Park Portfolio.
It shows one tenth of the Portfolio images to provide a comprehensive single page preview
of Yosemite Valley Views and Rock Features, Rivers, Creeks, Waterfalls, the Rim Points,
Wildlife and Plant Life. Bodie Ghost Town, Mono Lake and Mariposa are not displayed.

Click an image to open a larger version.
Use your back button to return to this page.

Yosemite Section Index
 

Yosemite Select

Yosemite Valley
Valley Views
Yosemite Assorted
Mirror Lake
Rivers and Creeks

Waterfalls
Yosemite Falls

Yosemite Rim
Glacier Point and Washburn Point
Taft Point

Yosemite Wildlife
Deer and Birds
Squirrel and Marmot

Yosemite Plant Life
Mariposa Grove
Sequoia National Park
Assorted Plant Life

Bodie Ghost Town
Mono Lake
Mariposa

A 75 image Overview of the Yosemite Portfolio

An Overview page with sample images from the following pages:
Discovery View (Wawona Tunnel View) and Valley View
El Capitan, Half Dome, Cathedral Rocks, and other Scenery
The exquisitely beautiful Mirror Lake in Tenaya Canyon
The Merced River, Tenaya Creek, Yosemite Creek and more

Bridalveil, Vernal and Nevada Falls, and selected images of Yosemite Falls
Detail shots, vignettes and scenic images of Yosemite’s signature waterfall

An Overview page with sample images from the following pages:
Yosemite National Park’s two most famous rim views
Taft Point Fissures and spectacular views from 3000’ over Yosemite Valley

An Overview page with sample images from the following pages:
Mule Deer in the Valley meadows, Hummingbirds, Steller’s Jays, etc.
Golden-Mantled Squirrels, Ground Squirrels and a Tioga Pass Marmot

An Overview page with sample images from the following pages:
Images from the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias
Images from nearby Sequoia and King’s Canyon National Parks
Lupines, Dogwood, Snow Plants, Thistle, Forest Moss and Lichen

50 images of the gold mining boom town north of Mono Lake
A highly saline lake in the Eastern Sierras with otherworldly scenery
A Cigar Store Indian, a Thunderbird Totem, and antique Farm Machinery

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Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Yosemite Collection page where a Gallery can be selected.

PhotoshelterGallerySection


There are 15 Galleries in the Photoshelter Yosemite Collection

For convenience, Galleries containing the images of Wildlife, Plants,
Sequoia National Park, Bodie Ghost Town, Mono Lake and Mariposa
have been copied to the Yosemite Collection from their normal locations.

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Yosemite_Valley_Dawn_Mist_X0333


Yosemite Valley Dawn Mist X0333
(286 KB)

Mist blankets Yosemite Valley at dawn in this scene taken in spring from Discovery View
(also called Tunnel View as it is the first view of the Valley after exiting the Wawona Tunnel).

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Wawona Tunnel at Dawn X0790
(480 KB)

The eastern side of the Wawona Tunnel on the Wawona Road (Highway 41) at dawn, with a car approaching in the distance. The Wawona Tunnel is 4230 feet long, 19 feet high and 28 feet wide and was bored through a solid granite mountain.

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Yosemite Valley Tunnel View 2694
(685 KB)

A mid-afternoon shot from Discovery View (Tunnel View) at the eastern portal of the Wawona Tunnel in May. The entire valley is evenly lit in the middle of the afternoon, and the light progressively softens and warms as sunset approaches.

Yosemite_Valley_Tunnel_View_3553


Yosemite Valley Tunnel View 3553
(787 KB)

Yosemite Valley in the early afternoon in May. Usually, the light is best later in the afternoon
and near sunset (although some interesting shots can be captured at dawn), but when there
are clouds in the sky, the shadows and cloud formations make this scene quite interesting.

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Yosemite Valley Wawona Tunnel Airshaft X2387
(681 KB)

Late afternoon wide angle of Yosemite Valley in May, during a year with a very
high snowfall. Notice the exceptional amount of water flowing over Bridalveil Fall.

This is a rather unusual view, taken from the airshaft about 200 yards from the
eastern end of the Wawona Tunnel. This view is not often seen. To get there, you
have to walk back down the tunnel from the eastern end, into the fathomless dark.
Beware of monsters. Just about the time when the hairs on your neck begin to twitch
you will sense an opening on your right. Enter here and duck to avoid the vampire bats.
Travel down this tunnel a few hundred feet to the opening. Do not run out of the opening
no matter how many monsters are chasing you, or you will find yourself treading air.
Once outside, look to your right. Don’t forget to pick your jaw up off the ground.

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Bridalveil Fall Spirit Faces Sunset Rainbow 2513
(457 KB)

The Spirit Faces of Chief Tenaya and his youngest son, and a double Rainbow below Bridalveil Fall at sunset in March.

Bridalveil_Fall_Sunset_Rainbow_3318


Bridalveil Fall Sunset Rainbow 3318
(617 KB)

Bridalveil Fall dances into a magnificent arc of color near sunset in May, from the parking lot below the fall.

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Merced River Dawn Reflection X6381
(667 KB)

Autumn foliage is reflected in the placid waters of the Merced River at dawn in October.

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Merced River Autumn Reflection X6414
(770 KB)

Autumn foliage along the banks of the Merced River and the conifer forest below Bridalveil Fall in October.

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Cathedral Rocks Autumn Reflection X6408
(552 KB)

Cathedral Rocks and Autumn foliage reflected in the waters of the Merced River. Bridalveil Fall is a mere trickle in October.

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Cathedral Rocks Valley View 2475
(619 KB)

Cathedral Rocks and Bridalveil Fall, taken in March from Valley View (also known as Gates of the Valley).

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El Capitan Cathedral Rocks Valley View 3765
(734 KB)

El Capitan, Cathedral Rocks and Bridalveil Fall from the log in the Merced River at Valley View.

El Capitan is a granite monolith rising more than 3000 feet over Yosemite Valley. The largest granite
monolith in the world and once considered unclimbable, it is now the world standard for big-wall climbers.

Cathedral_Rocks_2085


Cathedral Rocks 2085
(567 KB)

Middle Cathedral Rock and Lower Cathedral Rock in the morning light from El Capitan Meadow.

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Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Yosemite Collection page where a Gallery can be selected.

PhotoshelterGallerySection


There are 15 Galleries in the Photoshelter Yosemite Collection

For convenience, Galleries containing the images of Wildlife, Plants,
Sequoia National Park, Bodie Ghost Town, Mono Lake and Mariposa
have been copied to the Yosemite Collection from their normal locations.

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El_Capitan_Autumn_Dawn_X6377


El Capitan Autumn Dawn X6377
(477 KB)

El Capitan and the Merced River at dawn in October.

El_Capitan_Vignette_1666


El Capitan Vignette 1666
(595 KB)

El Capitan in vignette, from the Merced River in summer.

El_Capitan_2827


El Capitan 2827
(633 KB)

El Capitan is a 3000 foot granite monolith on the north side of Yosemite Valley. It is the largest granite monolith in the world.

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Half Dome at Sunset Sentinel Bridge 2307
(519 KB)

Half Dome at sunset in March (Sentinel Bridge). Half Dome is the most familiar rock feature at Yosemite.

Half_Dome_Sunset_Cloud_2589


Half Dome Sunset Cloud 2589
(488 KB)

A cloud settles over the shoulder of Half Dome at sunset in March.

Half Dome (Tis-sa’ack, Cleft Rock), is the name of a woman that Mono Paiute legend states
was turned into stone for bringing anger into the Valley, and also the name of the fair-skinned
woman in the legend of Tis-sa’ack and Totock’anula (El Capitan). It rises more than 4,700 feet
above the valley floor, and was formed by rock peeling off the face due to exfoliation processes.

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Merced River Half Dome First Light X0364
(504 KB)

The Merced River and Half Dome at first light in May from Sentinel Bridge. Mist hugs the waters of the Merced River and passes in front of Half Dome where it reflects the rising sun.

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Merced River Cathedral Rocks Sunrise X0817
(672 KB)

The Merced River and the Gunsight of Cathedral Rocks at sunrise, taken in May from the Swinging Bridge which crosses the Merced River at Leidig Meadow.

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Yosemite Falls Sunrise Swinging Bridge X0573
(732 KB)

Yosemite Falls reflected in the waters of the Merced River at sunrise, from Swinging Bridge.

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Upper Yosemite Fall Dawn X0366
(409 KB)

Upper Yosemite Fall at dawn in May from Cook’s Meadow.

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Yosemite Falls Reflection Dawn X0381
(466 KB)

Yosemite Falls in superb dawn light from Cook’s Meadow.

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Yosemite Falls Reflection Dawn X0349
(421 KB)

Yosemite Falls is reflected in the flooded Leidig Meadow at dawn in May, during a year with an exceptional snowmelt.

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Yosemite Falls Forest Vignette X0418
(505 KB)

Yosemite Falls from the Western Approach, vignetted by the forest at mid-morning in May.

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Ephemeral Fall Ice Cone 4604
(540 KB)

An ephemeral fall at the edge of El Capitan Meadow, just west of Sentinel Rock in March. Note the ice cone below. Mist from the fall freezes overnight from winter through early spring. Ice cones can be seen at Yosemite Falls and Ribbon Fall.

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Sentinel Rock 4690
(468 KB)

The western face of Sentinel Rock, across the valley from Yosemite Falls, shot at 300mm from El Capitan Meadow. Sentinel Rock was used as a lookout  by the Ahwahneechee, the Yosemite Mono Paiutes who lived in the valley.

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Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Yosemite Collection page where a Gallery can be selected.

PhotoshelterGallerySection


There are 15 Galleries in the Photoshelter Yosemite Collection

For convenience, Galleries containing the images of Wildlife, Plants,
Sequoia National Park, Bodie Ghost Town, Mono Lake and Mariposa
have been copied to the Yosemite Collection from their normal locations.

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Brewers_Lupine_Mirror_Lake_Trail_4002


Brewers Lupine Mirror Lake Trail 4002
(407 KB)

Brewer’s Lupine on the Mirror Lake Trail.

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Ground Squirrel Full Cheeks Mirror Lake 2436c
(320 KB)

A California Ground Squirrel with his cheeks filled with nuts. He became more comical looking with each passing moment. Later, we found out where he had been getting them (!).

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Royal Arches Washington Column 2990
(914 KB)

Royal Arches, North Dome and Washington Column from Stoneman Meadow in May.

Royal Arches (Choko’ni, or Shade of the Baby Basket) is below North Dome (Tocoya, The Basket).
Washington Column is the protruding shaft of rock at the eastern end of the Royal Arches formation.

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Dogwood Mirror Lake Trail X0851
(354 KB)

Pacific Dogwood blossoms beside the Mirror Lake Trail, early on a spring morning.

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Lower Tenaya Creek X2159
(651 KB)

A section of Lower Tenaya Creek, where the creek falls into a forest grove
and makes a turn to the left towards the Merced River, taken at 2 seconds.

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Lower Tenaya Creek Dawn X0684
(356 KB)

The section of Lower Tenaya Creek immediately below Lower Mirror Lake, taken at 1/2 second to emphasize water flow.

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Lower Tenaya Creek Sunrise X0868
(507 KB)

The outflow from Lower Mirror Lake at sunrise in May, taken at 1/3 second to emphasize water flow.

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Lower Tenaya Creek Sunrise X0860
(472 KB)

Tenaya Creek below Lower Mirror Lake at sunrise,  taken at 1/6 second for more detail.

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Mirror Lake Boulder 2857
(868 KB)

The Mirror Lake Boulder reflected in the placid waters of Lower Mirror Lake, late afternoon in May.

Mirror_Lake_Boulder_Ahwiyah_Point_3614


Mirror Lake Boulder Ahwiyah Point 3614
(539 KB)

The Lower Mirror Lake Boulder, dappled with shadows and light, and Ahwiyah Point in the late afternoon in May.

Lower_Mirror_Lake_Ahwiyah_Point_3610


Lower Mirror Lake Ahwiyah Point 3610
(439 KB)

Lower Mirror Lake and Ahwiyah Point in the late afternoon in May, from just out of the left frame of the previous image.

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Mirror Lake Mount Watkins X2170
(733 KB)

The renowned reflection of Mount Watkins in Mirror Lake in the late afternoon in May,
during a year with an exceptional snowfall and the resulting flooding from melting snow.

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Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Yosemite Collection page where a Gallery can be selected.

PhotoshelterGallerySection


There are 15 Galleries in the Photoshelter Yosemite Collection

For convenience, Galleries containing the images of Wildlife, Plants,
Sequoia National Park, Bodie Ghost Town, Mono Lake and Mariposa
have been copied to the Yosemite Collection from their normal locations.

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Mirror_Lake_Ahwiyah_Point_Last_Light_Autumn_X6343


Mirror Lake Ahwiyah Point Last Light Autumn X6343
(475 KB)

Ahwiyah Point and Mount Watkins overlook the Lower Mirror Lake sandbox at last light
in autumn. By October, Mirror Lake is completely dry until the first heavy rains fill it again.

The soft subdued light on the landscape and the pink and blue sky make a wonderful scene.

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Lower Tenaya Creek 2844
(573 KB)

Lower Tenaya Creek on a cloudy mid-afternoon in May, taken at 1/125 second to stop much of the motion in the water.

Yosemite_Creek_2471


Yosemite Creek 2471
(489 KB)

Yosemite Creek winding through the Valley below Yosemite Falls in the late afternoon in March.

Sugar_Pine_Bridge_Merced_River_3641


Sugar Pine Bridge Merced River 3641
(815 KB)

The Sugar Pine Bridge was built in 1928 to carry the Curry Stables Road
across the Merced River. The 106 foot span of the Sugar Pine Bridge is
the longest single span of the 8 historical bridges in Yosemite Valley.

Stellers_Jay_Mirror_Lake_2762


Steller’s Jay Mirror Lake 2762
(334 KB)

A Steller’s Jay perched on Manzanita near Mirror Lake in March.

Pacific Steller’s Jays have azure markings on the head and azure
primary feathers and tail, with duller blue feathers on the rest of the body.

Mule_Deer_in_Lupines_Wawona_3351


Mule Deer in Lupines Wawona 3351
(382 KB)

A group of Mule Deer browsing a field of Lupines in a North Wawona meadow at dusk. These were taken while I was exploring the area above the Wawona Hotel.
 

At right is a detail crop showing a close portrait of a young Mule Deer buck I encountered in a small meadow in the forest near the Wawona Hotel at sunset. The light was absolutely exquisite, and the expression on his face was priceless.

The image below is of the same young Mule Deer buck and his companion, another young buck relaxing at sunset.

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Mule Deer at Sunset Wawona 2758
(466 KB)

Mule_Deer_at_Sunset_Wawona_2773


Mule Deer at Sunset Wawona 2773
(484 KB)

The expressive young buck and one of his totally relaxed companions. Several other images
of this group of Wawona Mule Deer at sunset are on the Yosemite Wildlife: Deer and Birds page.

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Marmot Tioga Pass 3151
(774 KB)

A Yellow-Bellied Marmot poses for a profile portrait at Olmsted Point on the Tioga Road.

Half_Dome_Olmsted_Point_Tioga_Pass_3171


Half Dome Olmsted Point Tioga Pass 3171
(819 KB)

Half Dome from Olmsted Point on the Tioga Road. Olmsted Point, named for the landscape
architect Frederick Law Olmsted, overlooks Tenaya Canyon from the Tioga Road at 8400 feet.

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Golden Mantle Nesting Taft Point Trail X6683c
(548 KB)

This was one of the funniest squirrel sequences I have taken. The Golden Mantle scooted over to a clump of grass and began to pack it into his mouth at high speed.

Golden_Mantle_Taft_Point_3459c


Golden Mantle Taft Point 3459c
(483 KB)

Another Golden-Mantled Ground Squirrel is performing his patented “aren’t I cute?” routine atop a boulder at Taft Point on the Yosemite Valley Rim.

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Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Yosemite Collection page where a Gallery can be selected.

PhotoshelterGallerySection


There are 15 Galleries in the Photoshelter Yosemite Collection

For convenience, Galleries containing the images of Wildlife, Plants,
Sequoia National Park, Bodie Ghost Town, Mono Lake and Mariposa
have been copied to the Yosemite Collection from their normal locations.

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Snow_Plants_3539


Snow Plants 3539
(457 KB)

Two Snow Plants (Sarcodes) erupt from the forest floor beside the Wawona Road in spring.
The Snow Plant, or Snow Flower (Sarcodes sanguinea) is a parasitic plant in the Heath family.
It does not photosynthesize to acquire nutrients, but instead taps into the network of forest fungus
to gain nutrients from the fungus, which supply nutrients to forest plants in exchange for fixed carbon.
The scarlet red flowering parts of the plant emerge in spring, usually in late May in the higher elevations.

These two Snow Plants are already producing flowers, even though the plants are still quite small.

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Forest Scene Taft Point Trail X6789
(606 KB)

A forest scene with a Red Fir stump on the Taft Point Trail.

Wolf_Lichen_Taft_Point_Trail_X6774


Wolf Lichen Taft Point Trail X6774
(672 KB)

Wolf Lichen covering tree branches on the Taft Point Trail.

Forest_Scene_Taft_Point_Trail_X6778


Forest Scene Taft Point Trail X6778
(1297 KB)

This forest scene just above Taft Point includes a fallen Red Fir covered with Wolf Lichen.

Wolf Lichen is a symbiotic combination of fungus and algae. Some scientists say that
“Lichens are fungi that have discovered agriculture”. They cultivate the algae to make food.
Wolf Lichen prefers areas which do not have canopy shade, and is most active in winter.

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Moss on Tree Yosemite Falls Trail X0401
(545 KB)

Forest moss on a fallen tree, backlit by diffuse sunlight on the Eastern Approach trail to Lower Yosemite Fall.

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Taft Point Fissure 3039
(581 KB)

One of the first of the deep fissures east of Taft Point. The drop at the end of the slide is well over 1000 feet.

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Taft Point Fissure 3045
(653 KB)

Detail of two rocks wedged between the walls of a fissure. This was taken at Taft Point on a bleak spring day in May.

The accepted theory on these fissures is that they were caused by an epic battle between Mothra and Godzilla
during a hiatus between movie deals in the 1960s. Reluctant to generate bad publicity caused by news coverage
of their destruction of America’s best-loved National Park, they time-travelled into the distant past where the gaping
gashes caused by their massive claws would not be filmed by Walter Cronkite for the evening news. Do not believe
the geologists who state that these fissures are part of a larger series of joints in this section of the park which may
have been created by a geologic fault running through the region. It was Godzilla and Mothra. There is no doubt.

Profile_Cliff_Taft_Point_3040


Profile Cliff Taft Point 3040
(617 KB)

With a little imagination, you can see the face etched into Profile Cliff.

As you can see, there are no railings protecting the edges of the Fissures or cliffs
(except for the railing at the promontory over Yosemite Valley). Taft Point is dangerous,
and if you have a fear of heights you would be well advised to stay away from the edges.
The drop is more than 1000 feet in some places, and over 3000 feet to the valley floor in
others. Your friends would lose sight of you long before you were squished like a bug
at the bottom, then they would have to walk all the way back to the valley because
you had the only set of car keys. Be careful around the edges at Taft Point.

Taft_Point_Fissure_FE_X6705


Taft Point Fissure FE X6705
(813 KB)

“Fisheye Fissure”

An extreme wide-angle oblique of one of the Taft Point Fissures at Profile Cliff,
taken with a Fisheye lens. The perspective is due to the 180 degree angle of view.

Taft_Point_Overlook_El_Capitan_X6752


Taft Point Overlook El Capitan X6752
(568 KB)

Taft Point Overlook, with a few hikers sitting on the rock for scale. El Capitan is on the right.
This is the view to the west from Promontory Rock (the only place where there is a railing).

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Awestruck Aussie Taft Point 3468
(637 KB)

Mark Bedson, one of my students from Australia, reacting to the spectacular view from
the naked overlook atop the Taft Point rock. Note the overhang above a sheer 3000 foot drop.
Also note the hardy little Juniper growing out of a crack in the rock. Amazing where some things grow.

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Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Yosemite Collection page where a Gallery can be selected.

PhotoshelterGallerySection


There are 15 Galleries in the Photoshelter Yosemite Collection

For convenience, Galleries containing the images of Wildlife, Plants,
Sequoia National Park, Bodie Ghost Town, Mono Lake and Mariposa
have been copied to the Yosemite Collection from their normal locations.

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Washburn_Point_View_3803


Washburn Point View 3803
(514 KB)

The view from Washburn Point in spring. At left is Tenaya Canyon and Half Dome,
in the center is Vernal Fall, Liberty Cap and Nevada Fall. At right above Nevada Fall
and behind Liberty Cap is Little Yosemite Valley, the Cascade Cliffs and Bunnell Point.

Half_Dome_Tenaya_Canyon_Glacier_Point_X6310


Half Dome Tenaya Canyon Glacier Point X6310
(625 KB)

The northeast view from Glacier Point, looking directly down on Tenaya Canyon, shows
Royal Arches, Indian Ridge, North Dome and Basket Dome, Tenaya Canyon and Half Dome
(from left) at mid-afternoon in October. In autumn, Mirror Lake (directly below Half Dome) is dry.

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Overhanging Rock First Light Glacier Point X6501
(376 KB)

The Moon hanging over Overhanging Rock at first light.

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Half Dome Glacier Point Sunset 3112
(468 KB)

Half Dome from Glacier Point at sunset in spring.

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Glacier Point Artist at Sunrise X6573
(358 KB)

An artist paints Half Dome and the Glacier Point view at sunrise in autumn.

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Nevada Fall Vernal Fall Glacier Point 3819
(621 KB)

Nevada_Fall_Vernal_Fall_Glacier_Point_2666


Nevada Fall Vernal Fall Glacier Point 2666
(552 KB)

Vernal Fall, Nevada Fall and Liberty Cap framed by conifers on the far right side of Glacier Point. At the top of the left frame are the Cascade Cliffs of the Little Yosemite Valley and the Clark Range of the High Sierras. On the right, detail of the falls.

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Giant Sequoia Mariposa Grove 2664
(729 KB)

A Giant Sequoia on a lower slope of the Mariposa Grove. It is hard to evaluate how big Giant Sequoias are from a distance as they are surrounded by other forest giants.

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Grizzly Giant Sequoia Mariposa Grove X0482
(685 KB)

The Grizzly Giant in the early afternoon in spring, with a group of visitors at its base to provide scale. The Grizzly Giant is 1800 years old, the oldest tree in the Mariposa Grove.

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Giant Sequoia Kings Canyon X6882
(500 KB)

A Giant Sequoia and surrounding forest in the Grant Grove.

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General Grant Tree Kings Canyon X0211
(736 KB)

The General Grant Tree, Grant Grove, King’s Canyon NP.

The General Grant Tree is the largest tree in the Grant Grove of Giant Sequoias in
King’s Canyon National Park, connected by the General’s Highway to Sequoia NP.
It is the third largest tree in the world by volume. In 1926, Calvin Coolidge proclaimed
the General Grant Tree to be the Nation’s Christmas Tree, after he was petitioned by
Charles E. Lee, who had organized the first Christmas program at the Grant Tree in
1925. Prior to 1931, the General Grant Tree was considered to be the largest tree in
the world due to its enormous base, but when it was measured and compared to the
General Sherman Tree in 1931, General Sherman turned out to be larger by volume.

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General Sherman Tree Sequoia X0206
(678 KB)

The General Sherman Tree in the Giant Forest of Sequoia NP is the largest single-stem tree in the world by volume. It was named for the Civil War general William Tecumseh Sherman.

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Giant Sequoia Fire Scar X6913
(624 KB)

A large vertical fire scar in a Giant Sequoia in the Grant Grove of King’s Canyon National Park. Giant Sequoia bark is thick, non-resinous, and resistant to fire.

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Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Yosemite Collection page where a Gallery can be selected.

PhotoshelterGallerySection


There are 15 Galleries in the Photoshelter Yosemite Collection

For convenience, Galleries containing the images of Wildlife, Plants,
Sequoia National Park, Bodie Ghost Town, Mono Lake and Mariposa
have been copied to the Yosemite Collection from their normal locations.

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YosemiteNP


Click the Display Composite above to visit the Yosemite Section Index page

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